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Overview
Pain in the heel of a child's foot, typically brought on by some form of injury or trauma, is sometimes Sever's Disease. The disease often mimics Achilles tendonitis, an inflammation of the tendon attached to the back of the heel. A tight Achilles tendon may contribute to Sever's Disease by pulling excessively on the growth plate of the heel bone. This condition is most common in younger children and is frequently seen in the active soccer, football or baseball player. Sport shoes with cleats are also known to aggravate the condition. Treatment includes calf muscle stretching exercises, heel cushions in the shoes, and/or anti-inflammatory medications. Consult your physician before taking any medications.

Causes
The heel bone grows faster than the ligaments in the leg. As a result, muscles and tendons can become very tight and overstretched in children who are going through growth spurts. The heel is especially susceptible to injury since the foot is one of the first parts of the body to grow to full size and the heel area is not very flexible. Sever?s disease occurs as a result of repetitive stress on the Achilles tendon. Over time, this constant pressure on the already tight heel cord can damage the growth plate, causing pain and inflammation. Such stress and pressure can result from, Sports that involve running and jumping on hard surfaces (track, basketball and gymnastics). Standing too long, which puts constant pressure on the heel. Poor-fitting shoes that don?t provide enough support or padding for the feet. Overuse or exercising too much can also cause Sever?s disease.

Symptoms
Symptoms of calcaneal apophysitis may include Pain in the back or bottom of the heel, Limping, Walking on toes, Difficulty running, jumping, or participating in usual activities or sports, Pain when the sides of the heel are squeezed.

Diagnosis
Most often, a healthcare professional can diagnose Sever?s disease by taking a careful history and administering a few simple tests during the physical exam. A practitioner may squeeze the heel on either side; when this move produces pain, it may be a sign of Sever?s disease. The practitioner may also ask the child to stand on their tiptoes, because pain that occurs when standing in this position can also be an indication of Sever?s disease.

Non Surgical Treatment
The disease itself is self limiting and will resolve regardless of treatment once the growth plate has fully closed. Depending on the age of the youth at onset this could be a problem for many years. Treatment has always been aimed at managing the pain as well as the inflammation. This is done with the rest, ice, non steroidal anti-inflammatories like ibuprofen, stretching, taping, heel cups, heel lifts and orthotics. In severe cases, cast or walking boot immobilization is used. Each of these have differing levels of efficacy but in my experience orthotics are the golden treatment or the silver bullet. I am not talking about your run of the mill over the counter Dr. Scholls shoe insert. These definitely have their place in the world but not here. Custom molded orthotics made from a mold taken of the youths foot will provide the necessary control and support to stop the pain cycle. We can safely report over 85% of patients who are able to get back to sports and other activities as long as they wear the orthotics in supportive shoes as directed.

Exercise
Stretching exercises can help. It is important that your child performs exercises to stretch the hamstring and calf muscles, and the tendons on the back of the leg. The child should do these stretches 2 or 3 times a day. Each stretch should be held for about 20 seconds. Both legs should be stretched, even if the pain is only in 1 heel. Your child also needs to do exercises to strengthen the muscles on the front of the shin. To do this, your child should sit on the floor, keeping his or her hurt leg straight. One end of a bungee cord or piece of rubber tubing is hooked around a table leg. The other end is hitched around the child's toes. The child then scoots back just far enough to stretch the cord. Next, the child slowly bends the foot toward his or her body. When the child cannot bend the foot pain f; virgiekingdon.weebly.com, any closer, he or she slowly points the foot in the opposite direction (toward the table). This exercise (15 repetitions of "foot curling") should be done about 3 times. The child should do this exercise routine a few times daily.



:: موضوعات مرتبط :

:: برچسب ها : hep c foot pain , foot pain from sciatica , foot pain after pregnancy ,
تاريخ : شنبه 28 مرداد 1396 | 6:46 | نویسنده : Dannielle Tennant |
Overview
A cavus or high-arched foot may have many foot shapes. This may range from an arch that is slightly high to a severe deformity that causes a patient to walk on the outside of the foot. Surgery is occasionally required to realign the foot.

Causes
Cavus foot is may be caused by a neurologic disorder or other medical conditions. For example, disorders such as cerebral palsy, Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease, spina bifida, polio, muscular dystrophy, or stroke may cause an abnormally high arch foot. In other cases, this structure may result from genetically inherited genes. Furthermore, what?s referred as ?drop foot? may also be present in conjunction to a cavus foot. This is when certain muscles do not function properly, leaving the foot essentially dragging when stepping and with other compensatory muscles essentially lifting the foot higher than normal and dropping it to the ground when walking. Foot drop is generally a sign of an underlying neurologic condition or possibly traumatically induced. Distinguishing the origin of a cavus foot is important because whether a neurological condition is present or not, the treatment plan will be dictated accordingly.Cavoid Foot

Symptoms
Cavus foot is typically identified by a high arch that is noticeable when standing. Additional symptoms may include hammertoes, claw toes, foot pain after pregnancy (lashaundanonnemacher.jimdo.com) instability, pain when walking or standing or calluses on the heel, ball or side of the foot. In some cases, individuals with cavus foot may also suffer from foot drop, which causes those affected to drag their feet when walking. As compared to a normally arched foot, high arches cause more pressure to be put on the metatarsals (the bones of the forefoot). Over time, this can result in pain, weakness and fatigue in the feet. High arches also shorten the feet, potentially making it difficult for a person to find shoes that fit. People with high arches may need special orthopedic shoes or inserts for support.

Diagnosis
General examination may reveal features of neurological conditions such as ?champagne bottle legs? (Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease), scoliosis in Friedreich ataxia, or a naevus, dimple or patch of hair over the spine in spina bifida occulta. The neurological examination should include a search for signs of peripheral nervous disease, such as muscle wasting, weakness and sensory deficit, and signs of central nervous disease, such as pyramidal signs, cerebellar signs or cranial nerve abnormalities. Accurate serial recording of power in individual muscle groups will allow the clinician to follow the disease over time and detect neurological progression.

Non Surgical Treatment
Treatment for cavus foot varies depending on the severity of your condition. Mild cases of cavus foot can often be remedied with foot and ankle bracing, custom-made orthotics or wearing more comfortable shoes. If your condition remains unresponsive to the aforementioned treatment methods, surgical treatment may be necessary. Surgery for cavus foot aims to relieve pain and improve stability.

Surgical Treatment
There is always a combination of many procedures that is done all at the same time to correct the various deformities. Occasionally, the surgery has to be staged in two sessions so that the hindfoot and ankle are first corrected followed by the toes.Pes Cavus



:: موضوعات مرتبط :

:: برچسب ها : foot pain map , foot pain getting worse , foot pain in the arch ,
تاريخ : شنبه 28 مرداد 1396 | 6:41 | نویسنده : Dannielle Tennant |
Overview
Achilles TendinitisYour Achilles tendon is located at the back of your foot, just above your heel. It connects your heel to the two muscles of your calf and helps your foot push forward every time you take a step. If the tendon becomes swollen or irritated due to overuse, it can lead to the painful condition called Achilles tendonitis. If Achilles tendonitis goes untreated, it can become a chronic (ongoing) condition that makes just walking around almost impossible. Achilles tendonitis is a very common running injury. But it can also affect basketball players, dancers, or people who put a lot of repeated stress on their feet. It can be very painful.

Causes
Unusual use or overuse of the lower leg muscles and Achilles tendon is usually the cause of Achilles tendinitis. Repetitive jumping, kicking, and sprinting can lead to Achilles tendinitis in both recreational and competitive athletes. Runners, dancers, and athletes over age 65 are especially at risk. Sudden increases in training or competition can also inflame your Achilles tendon. For example, adding hills, stair-climbing, or sprinting to your running workout puts extra stress on your Achilles tendon. Improper technique during training can also strain the tendon. Intense running or jumping without stretching and strengthening your lower leg muscles can put you at risk regardless of your age or fitness level. Running on tight, exhausted, or fatigued calf muscles can put added stress on your Achilles tendon, as your tendon may not be ready to quickly start a workout after a period of inactivity. Direct blows or other injuries to the ankle, foot, or lower leg may pull your Achilles tendon too far and stretch the tissue. A hard contraction of the calf muscles, such as can happen when you push for the final sprint in a race, can strain the tendon. People whose feet roll inward, a condition called overpronation, are particularly at risk. Sometimes, shoes with too much heel cushioning put extra strain on the Achilles tendon.

Symptoms
The main complaint associated with Achilles tendonitis is pain behind the heel. The pain is often most prominent in an area about 2-4 centimeters above where the tendon attaches to the heel. In this location, called the watershed zone of the tendon, the blood supply to the tendon makes this area particularly susceptible. Patients with Achilles tendonitis usually experience the most significant pain after periods of inactivity. Therefore patients tend to experience pain after first walking in the morning and when getting up after sitting for long periods of time. Patients will also experience pain while participating in activities, such as when running or jumping. Achilles tendonitis pain associated with exercise is most significant when pushing off or jumping.

Diagnosis
The doctor will perform a physical exam. The doctor will look for tenderness along the tendon and pain in the area of the tendon when you stand on your toes. X-rays can help diagnose bone problems. An MRI scan may be done if your doctor is thinking about surgery or is worried about the tear in the Achilles tendon.

Nonsurgical Treatment
Proper footwear with a strong and secure counter (the heel circumference) may help to encourage heeling of the tendon. A tendinitis will occasionally resolve on it?s own, with rest, ice, and gentle stretching. If symptoms persist for more than 2 weeks, consult your physician. Your physician may suggest physiotherapy and custom orthotics. Physiotherapy can suggest appropriate exercises and modalities to aid in the healing process. Custom orthotics can be very successful in treating the problem, as the original cause may be due to an improper alignment of the foot pain icd 10 - wanitareburn.blogas.lt - and heel. Re-aligning the foot to a neutral position may provide an optimal, biomechanically sound environment for healing to occur.

Achilles Tendinitis
Surgical Treatment
In most surgeries, damaged tissue is cleaned out before surgeons make the necessary repairs. However, a new minimally-invasive surgery to repair a torn Achilles tendon actually uses the damaged tissue to help repair the tear. The percutaneous Achilles repair system, or PARS technique, enables surgeons to better repair a torn Achilles tendon through a smaller incision. This procedure was recently performed at Houston Methodist Hospital to treat an NFL cornerback, getting him back on field for this season.

Prevention
A 2014 study looked at the effect of using foot orthotics on the Achilles tendon. The researchers found that running with foot orthotics resulted in a significant decrease in Achilles tendon load compared to running without orthotics. This study indicates that foot orthoses may act to reduce the incidence of chronic Achilles tendon pathologies in runners by reducing stress on the Achilles tendon1. Orthotics seem to reduce load on the Achilles tendon by reducing excessive pronation,



:: موضوعات مرتبط :

:: برچسب ها : foot pain cures , foot pain causes , foot pain in the arch ,
تاريخ : شنبه 21 مرداد 1396 | 23:06 | نویسنده : Dannielle Tennant |